GOP's challenge: finding votes for Senate health care bill

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That's not my opinion, but rather the conclusion of all objective analyses, from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which found that 23 million Americans would lose insurance, to America's doctors, nurses, and hospitals on the front lines of our health care system.

But the measure landed in rough seas ahead of a vote that Sen.

"Over the course of the next several days, I will review the draft legislation released this morning, using several factors to evaluate whether it provides access to affordable health care for West Virginians, including those on the Medicaid expansion and those struggling with drug addiction", Capito said in a news release Thursday.

Nonetheless, Heller's announcement underscores the scant margin of error Republican leaders must deal with. McConnell, R-Ky., has little margin for error: Facing unanimous Democratic opposition, "no" votes by just three of the 52 GOP senators would sink the legislation.

But as of now, he appears well short of that striking distance, with at least four conservatives announcing their public disapproval and at least four of the GOP moderate expressing concerns over the Medicaid cuts.

"The Medicaid cuts are even more draconian that the House bill was, though they take effect more gradually than the House bill did", Pearson says. He and others said the measure would make health insurance more affordable and eliminate Obama coverage requirements that some people find onerous.

"This bill may change, but Republicans will only be putting lipstick on a devastating blow to Americans' health care", said Sen.

That was a reference to other provisions of the Republican plan that would cut taxes by almost $1 trillion over the next decade, mostly for corporations and America's wealthiest families.

"To begin with, the draft Senate health care bill makes no change in the law protecting people with pre-existing conditions, no change in Medicare benefits, and increases Medicaid funding - that's TennCare - at the rate of inflation", Alexander's statement reads.

It would kill jobs-more than 1.5 million nationally by some estimates, including tens of thousands in states as diverse as Maine, West Virginia, Arizona, and Alaska.

Both bills roll back a Medicaid expansion undertaken under the Affordable Care Act.

"Over time, it will hopefully go up less rapidly than it was otherwise going to go up, but sort of permanently expanding federal contributions in the Medicaid category are simply not a catastrophic cut, as some would like to characterize it", Toomey said.

The subsidies will be linked to recipients' income in the Senate bill, a "major improvement" from a measure approved last month by the House that tied them exclusively to age, Republican Senator Susan Collins said.

"In this form, I will not support it", Heller said. It would be politically hard for Heller to take a different stance on the measure from the popular Sandoval. Not really. Does the new bill have the "heart" that Trump demanded?

Rand Paul of Kentucky, who has rejected the plan along with fellow Republican Senators Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, said fundamental problems still remain that would leave taxpayers subsidizing health insurance companies.

Underscoring the sensitivity of the bill, Sen. "So, we have 142 pages to go through", she said.

But Caroline Pearson, a senior vice president at the consulting firm Avalere Health, says the bill bases its tax credits on lower-quality insurance."If you're paying a similar percentage of income, you're getting a less generous product under this new plan", she says. They would all agree that not just any plan that lowers taxes paid by the rich and cuts healthcare benefits for the poor the sick, and the elderly will meet our nation's needs with big Medicare benefits and medicaid benefits being cut.

Realizing they're outnumbered, Democrats and their liberal allies were planning events around the USA over the next few days aimed at building public opposition to the bill.

Nearly immediately, the pro-Trump group America First Policies made a decision to launch what a source with the group says will be a major television, radio and digital ad buy against Heller - a remarkable attack on a member of Trump's own party whose seat is endangered in 2018.

Regina Garcia Cano reported from Las Vegas. Contributing were AP reporters Becky Bohrer in Juneau, Alaska; Bobby Caina Calvan in Helena, Montana; Bob Christie in Phoenix; Kristena Hansen in Salem, Oregon; Marc Levy in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Alison Noon in Carson City, Nevada; Bob Salsberg in Boston; Sophia Tareen in Springfield, Illinois; and Kristen Wyatt in Denver.

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